A good hanging now and then — that entertains folk in the provinces and robs death of its glamour.

What did Jean-Paul Sartre mean by:

A good hanging now and then — that entertains folk in the provinces and robs death of its glamour.

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This quote speaks to the idea that witnessing the harsh realities of life, like death, can serve as a form of entertainment for some, while also demystifying the concept of death itself. The phrase "a good hanging now and then" suggests a public execution, which historically was a form of spectacle for the masses. These events, while grim, served to entertain people, particularly those in the provinces or more rural areas where such spectacles were rare.

The latter part of the quote, "robs death of its glamour," suggests that witnessing such a harsh event demystifies death, removing any romantic or glamorous notions one might have about it. Instead, death is seen for what it truly is – a grim and inescapable part of life.

Applying this idea to today’s world or personal development, it can be interpreted as the importance of facing harsh realities head-on, rather than romanticizing or avoiding them. This could mean acknowledging the inevitable hardships and failures that come with life and personal growth, rather than only focusing on the successes.

In a broader societal context, it could also refer to the importance of transparency and openness about the darker aspects of life. For instance, in the media or public discourse, discussing difficult topics like death, violence, or injustice, rather than shying away from them, can help to demystify these issues and lead to a more informed and understanding society.

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