Wentworth Dillon, 4th Earl of Roscommon Quotes

  • Poet
  • Ireland
  • 1633

Wentworth Dillon, 4th Earl of Roscommon, was a prominent Irish poet and politician in the late 17th and early 18th centuries. He is best known for his influential critical work “An Essay on Translated Verse” and his translations of classical works such as Horace’s “Ars Poetic…Read More

Wentworth Dillon, 4th Earl of Roscommon, was a prominent Irish poet and politician in the late 17th and early 18th centuries. He is best known for his influential critical work “An Essay on Translated Verse” and his translations of classical works such as Horace’s “Ars Poetica.” Roscommon was also a member of the English Parliament and served as Lord Privy Seal of Ireland. He was highly regarded by his contemporaries for his wit, intelligence, and literary talent. Despite his early death at the age of 36, Roscommon’s works continued to be admired and studied by later generations.Read Less

Wentworth Dillon, 4th Earl of Roscommon, was a prominent Irish poet and politician in the late 17th and early 18th centuries. He is best known for his influential critical work “An Essay on Translated Verse” and his translations of classical works such as Horace’s “Ars Poetica.” Roscommon was also a member of the English Parliament and served as Lord Privy Seal of Ireland. He was highly regarded by his contemporaries for his wit, intelligence, and literary talent. Despite his early death at the age of 36, Roscommon’s works continued to be admired and studied by later generations.

4 Insightful Wentworth Dillon, 4th Earl of Roscommon Quotes

Wentworth Dillon, 4th Earl of Roscommon Career Highlights

  • Born in 1633, Wentworth Dillon, 4th Earl of Roscommon, was a prominent Irish poet and politician during the Restoration period in England.
  • He was educated at Trinity College, Dublin and later served as a member of the Irish House of Lords.
  • In 1665, he moved to England and became a member of the English House of Lords, where he was known for his wit and eloquence.
  • Roscommon was a patron of the arts and was a member of the Royal Society, a prestigious scientific organization.
  • He also served as a courtier to King Charles II and was a close friend of the famous playwright, John Dryden.

Key Contributions by Wentworth Dillon, 4th Earl of Roscommon

  • Roscommon is best known for his poetry, which was heavily influenced by the classical works of ancient Greece and Rome.
  • He was a pioneer of the neoclassical movement in English literature, which emphasized the use of classical forms and themes.
  • His most famous work, “Essay on Translated Verse,” was a critical analysis of the art of translation and had a significant impact on the development of English poetry.
  • Roscommon also wrote plays and translations of classical works, including Virgil’s “Aeneid” and Horace’s “Ars Poetica.”

What Sets Wentworth Dillon, 4th Earl of Roscommon Apart

  • Roscommon’s poetry was highly praised for its elegance, clarity, and adherence to classical principles.
  • He was known for his skillful use of language and his ability to adapt classical forms to the English language.
  • Roscommon’s work had a significant influence on the development of English literature and helped shape the neoclassical movement.
  • He was also known for his wit and charm, which made him a popular figure in literary and social circles.

Takeaways

  • Wentworth Dillon, 4th Earl of Roscommon, was a prominent figure in the literary and political circles of 17th century England.
  • His poetry and critical works had a lasting impact on the development of English literature.
  • Roscommon’s adherence to classical principles and his skillful use of language set him apart from his contemporaries.
  • He is remembered as a talented poet, a patron of the arts, and a key figure in the neoclassical movement.
Other People
4th Earl of Roscommon
Poet
· Ireland
1633
A. C. Benson
Poet
· England
1862 - 1925
A. D. Gordon
Poet
· Russian Empire
1856

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